Without fear there cannot be courage.

Learn travel healthcare like a from fellow travelers (unbiased and honest)

I can’t believe I did not pack sunglasses” I whispered to myself.

I had just landed in San Diego. The land of sunshine.

But the sunglasses I needed had nothing to do with the sun.

I couldn’t stop crying. In the middle of the airport. Waiting for my bags.

I would have done anything for a pair of sunglasses.

Two years ago

I hung a canvas over my bed.

The canvas was a picture of a sunset. It was a sun that was 30 seconds away from tucking itself behind the horizon, and the colors spanned the entire spectrum. Purples and blues and pinks and oranges. I took that picture standing on the cliffs in La Jolla, San Diego. It was magic. And I looked at that picture every night for two years. And it called to me.

Five years ago

I moved to Nashua, New Hampshire.

What started out as a place to spend time with my brother unwillingly became home base. First, it was a growing wedding photography and film business that my brother and I decided to start together. Brides book a year in advance and I was embracing and enjoying the challenges of starting a business with him. I found a passion I didn’t know I had!

Every fall and summer I would take pictures of love and document the day two stories became one. I have a beating romantic heart and every vow, every daddy-daughter dance would light me up behind my camera. “Just one more year,” I would say, “Then I’ll move to California.” I would say this. Every year. For five years.

And then, love happened. Did I mention I am a hopeless romantic? A love story between a wanderlust heart and a Nashua townie. On date one, two things happened. One: I told him there was no way I would still be in Nashua in a year. Two: Every person that walked through the door of that coffee shop knew him. He was a small-town celebrity, and he was not going to leave Nashua. Only I didn’t know that yet. And his big laugh and kind heart grew ties to mine.

Three years ago

I found myself living with him.

In a huge house. In Nashua. And I found myself doing everything I could to tell myself I could be happy there. I told myself “He will travel with me. Soon. He will. Be patient. He promised we would travel together one day. Be patient.”

We never once got on a plane together.

I started losing myself.

When you say something enough times.

And it doesn’t happen.

You lose faith in yourself.

I became a joke.

In my head.

To myself.

And to my friends that lived there.

“I thought you were moving a year ago” people would laugh.

“You’re still here?” they would ask.

I would break on the inside and laugh with them on the outside.

“Would you leave already?” is all I heard.

“You don’t belong here,” is all I heard.

“You smile too much,”

A bartender told me this very early in my Nashua days.

What might have been a careless sentence from that bartender became words I would never forget.

“If she is that happy, she must be fake,” he joked with his friend.

“Laura, if you want to fit in here, be less… of you.” is all I heard.

And I heard it in a hundred different ways throughout my years there.

I didn’t know how to fit in.

I didn’t know how to make friends for the first time in my life.

And my life became pretend.

For five years, excluding family, I could count my true friends in the town I was living in on one finger.

The world of people that really knew me were all far away.

Oh, but did I try.

I started meetup groups, went to events, tried my hand at prayer.

I tried so hard to fit into the box of Nashua. To fit in with my boyfriend’s family who adamantly rejected me. To be someone. Anyone. Worth something. Anything. In this town.

And I would leave Nashua.

Sometimes for six months at a time.

Have an adventure. Give my heart a boost.

But somehow. I would wake up. And there I would be. Year after year.

Back in Nashua.

The truth?

I was scared.

I was ashamed of not giving my heart a home.

Ashamed of being lonely.

Of living in a place where I didn’t feel alive.

For making up the narrative that I was not enough because my serious boyfriend would not leave Nashua with me.

I was telling myself something was deeply wrong with me for not being able to find a tribe there.

Embarrassed for not leaving sooner. Embarrassed for being unhappy. Embarrassed for finding reasons to stay.

For giving in.

I did, in fact, become a person who smiled less, felt less, was less… worth less.

I was less Laura. And I don’t know whose life I was living, but it wasn’t mine.

May 12th, 2018.

I saw palm trees outside the window of the airport.

I saw a welcome to San Diego sign.

My heart knew there was no turning back.

That I had no home to go back to.

And I was alone.

It was just me.

So overwhelmingly just me.

Will I be enough?

A leap of faith.

Of courage.

I was terrified.

Liberated.

Happy.

Sad.

Untethered.

All the feels.

All of them.

All at once.

And so I cry.

Tears of all the feels.

Tears of hope and joy and sadness and anger.

And the tears flow.

And I have no sunglasses.

Right in the middle of the airport.

The Uber driver told me about all the best neighborhoods and gave me the contact details of a landlord that owns 34 units in town.

My Airbnb has a balcony that overlooks the ocean. I walk into a welcome letter and a bottle of rosé with a big bow on it. I cheers myself for being brave.

I walk to the beach. It is perfect. I walk down the street with all the restaurants and coffee shops and life. I pass bikes that you can ride with a click of an app. And electric scooters. I touch all the palm trees. I feel the sun. I smile at everyone who passes me. They smile back.

I look to the right.

The sun. It is setting.

So I run. I run as fast as I can.

I run right to the view of the sunset.

It was 30 seconds away from tucking itself behind the horizon. The colors spanned the entire spectrum. Purples and blues and pinks and oranges.

I take this moment in with every piece of me.

“Laura, you made it to your canvas!” my soul says in delight.

My heart smiles. My face smiles.

And a person walks up to me.

“Hey,” they say.

“Hi,” I say.

“Something just told me to tell you. You have the most wonderful smile”.

And just like that.

I know I am going to be okay.

 

xo Laura

Keep learning, empowered travelers 💪

Where do you want to travel to?

Tell us in a quick survey and we will match you with vetted recruiters who have the locations, benefits, and personality you want!

Empowered travelers are travelers that love to learn and grow! Learn how the industry works and use our free tools to be confident and excited about your journey ahead! 

Additional Reimbursements

Did your offer come with something extra that would cost the staffing agency money? This may include a CEU class, scrubs, or sign on bonuses. Don’t worry if this section is blank, most offers don’t have extra reimbursements.

Travel Reimbursements

This is tax-free money that is paid to you to help you pay for the expense of traveling to your assignment. Many staffing agencies pay for this per mile up to a certain amount. They will usually pay this on your first paycheck or split between your first paycheck and last. If you are traveling a short distance this could be a very small amount.

Also, it’s becoming more popular for an agency to not offer this at all. It’s really not a big deal though. If you don’t get travel reimbursement money you should make a bit more in your weekly pay so many times it all equals out.

Weekly Housing Stipends

If you have a tax home you can get money in two ways: Your taxable base pay per hour + tax-free stipends that help pay for your housing and meals in your new city. This is usually presented to travelers on a weekly or per shift basis.

The government tells the staffing agency the maximum they are allowed to pay travelers based on the cost of living in each zip code.

The staffing company does not usually get to pay us the full amount since they only have the amount the facility is willing to pay for us. That may end up being less than the government’s max, if so, no worries. This is okay as long as the total package is fair.

Weekly Meal Stipends

If you have a tax home you can get money in two ways: Your taxable base pay per hour + tax-free stipends that help pay for your housing and meals in your new city. This is usually presented to travelers on a weekly or per shift basis.

The government tells the staffing agency the maximum they are allowed to pay travelers based on the cost of living in each zip code. The staffing company does not usually get to pay us the full amount since they only have the amount the facility is willing to pay for us. That may end up being less than the government’s max, if so, no worries. This is okay as long as the total package is fair.

Weekly Insurance Costs

Medical insurance can impact your final paycheck a lot since it will deduct pay from your check each week. If you are taking the company health insurance, you are going to want to know up front about how much this will cost you per week.

The average is around $30 a week but some companies charge as much as $100 a week to their travelers and some offer some health insurance options for free. If you are not taking their insurance just set this to zero.

Hours per week

For this calculation, put the hours per week you are expecting to work. And then feel free to run it again with the hours you are guaranteed. Many times contracts have guaranteed hours that are lower than the expected hours.

Guaranteed hours means if the facility doesn’t need you to come in, you will still get paid as long as it was their choice and not yours to not work.

Also, find out if this contract has any “call off shifts” where the hospital can call you off without pay a certain number of times per contract. This is common and not a deal breaker but just good to know!

Length of assignment

In travel nurses and allied health the most common length of a travel assignment is 13 weeks. If you are looking for a contract shorter or longer just ask! Sometimes facilities or hospitals who hire you will be flexible.

Taxable rate per hour

If you have a tax home you can get money in two ways: Your taxable base pay per hour + tax-free stipends that help pay for your housing and meals in your new city.

If you do not have a tax home all of your pay will be taxed and put in this field.

Good to know: Your taxable base pay is the only part of your paycheck that is legally considered income. The average taxable base pay is $20 but you might get offers higher or lower than this. It’s the only part of your paycheck that is taxed

Nomadicare’s purpose is to empower. It’s the lifeblood that flows through every single thing we create. We are here to make sure every traveler has all the transparent knowledge they need to make empowered decisions. We want you to feel confident so you can live your dream!

Nomadicare is partnered with dozens of companies and each of those companies have access to different settings, locations, and exclusive contracts. We know their benefit options and who have jobs in each location. We will match you to the best recruiters for you and your goals. Every single recruiter has been vetted and comes with the Nomadicare guarantee.
You can browse the open jobs from many of our company partners on the Nomadicare’s anti bait and switch job board. When you see one that catches your eye, the goal is to apply asap. Jobs are closing faster than ever with all the craziness this year so speed is our best friend. When you request an interview, we’ll instantly match you with the vetted recruiter who posted that job.
Typically 0-3 months before you are ready to start your next assignment is best. A short quiz will give us a picture of who you are, and what you are looking for. After the quiz we’ll have everything we need to match you with the perfect recruirer for your travel goals
If you know where you want to go and you’re ready to travel, Instant Matching is perfect for you. You can browse the open jobs from many of our company partners on the Nomadicare’s anti bait-and-switch job board. When you see one that catches your eye, the goal is to apply asap. Jobs are closing faster than ever with all the craziness this year so speed is our best friend.
We highly recommended being ready! Having all of your documents and being super responsive are key. Speed is the biggest factor in getting the job you want. We recommend using a free service like Kamana, which you can share your online resume, credentials, and licenses with a single link to any of our vetted recruiters when requesting an interview.
Graph Café, Chiang Mai, Thailand 🥇